Mastering this skill is just as important as your ability to draw

When I was in my teens and visited comic book stores regularly, I used to open bunches of comic books at the comic book store every week.  You know what I used to say a lot, “the art in this book stinks”. 

You ever see art that is, well, bad but yet it’s selling?  Guess what, crappy art that sells is everywhere.  The main question you probably have is, why is no one buying YOUR art?  This reminds me of something I heard Brian Tracy say.

“Your ability to sell your product is more important than any other skill.”

It is VERY hard to earn as much money as you want as an artist without having a complete understanding of the kind of person that buys your product.  I’m not talking about a niche, I’m talking about a customer profile.  

Your niche may be art directors in Fortune 500 companies who need cartoons for newsletters but your customer profile may be female art directors between ages 35-45 with 10+ years of experience in their field who earn at least $70,000 a year.

Let’s say you market to school teachers because that’s who buys most your art.  That’s great but not all teachers are the same.  Do you think high school teachers in a large inner city school are going to have the same buying habits as teachers in small rural catholic schools?  I’m thinking they’re going to be different.  

Here’s what you do:

1.  Make a list of your best clients.

2.  Look at their common attributes (location, income, demographics, job title, time in business etc.).

3.  Ask your clients why they hired you instead of a different artist.

That’s it.  Slowly you will notice things repeating and you’ll want to take notes of all that wonderfulinformation. 

Adam